Interak keyboard – proof of the pudding

This is just a quick post.

I’ve spent some of the afternoon in a happy state re-living the 1980’s by typing in a hex dump from a magazine and spotting my mistyping.

161023-img_20161023_201745The magazine in question was Interaktion – newsleter No. 2 from the Interak user group and as you can see, the program is a version breakout.

You can see in the photo that I have added the USB serial mod I hinted at in the last post. This enables me to use a PC to squirt data through a virtual serial port and have it appear at the Interak as though it had been typed in.

Thanks go to Alan Paton at http://www.interak.co.uk for putting the newsletters onto the ‘net.

 

Retrochallenge 2016/2 – Interak keyboard wrap-up

160915-img_20160915_204655In my last two posts I wrote about how I made an adapter for my 1980’s Interak-1 computer so that it could make use of USB keyboards as the original Alphameric keyboard had failed.

Those posts were a bit rushed and the adapter was still a work in progress. It’s finished now and so in this post I’ll try to tell the full story and in more detail so if anyone else has the need for a USB keyboard to 7-bit parallel ASCII keyboard they will have something to follow.

The problem.

The Interak comes from an era before USB became ubiquitous, when a parallel cable running from a semi-intelligent keyboard to the main CPU was commonplace.

161005-img_20161005_192546With these keyboards, when a key is pressed, the binary representation of the key, in ASCII, is presented on seven data lines. An eighth bit called Strobe is then pulsed high (5V) and then low (0V) to indicate to the CPU that a character is ready.

Sadly, the keyboard that came with my Interak had developed a fault and several columns of keys didn’t work at all. I tested the socketed chips with my IC tester but they seemed OK and so I suspected the micro-controller and I didn’t want to go too far down that road and so I decided to do away with the  original keyboard.

What to do now?

I looked around for a while and found a number of solutions that will use PC keyboards with the PC-mini-DIN connector but they haven’t been mainstream for over ten years and I didn’t want to end up with the same problem later.

USB is the way to go.

When USB is the solution… Crikey.

161001-img_20161001_181323In all honesty, I don’t know a great deal about USB and the though of writing a USB host to interface with a keyboard seems like no kind of fun (Retrochallenge is meant to be fun) and so I looked around for solutions and found HobbyTronics who produce a small USB host board that just needs 5v and will produce a serial output.

Although a serial stream isn’t what’s needed, it is easy to pipe it into an Arduino and get that to output the ASCII in parallel on its IO pins.

161001-img_20161001_205049I made a prototype using an Arduino UNO connected to the Hobbytronics board.

To make debugging easier I used a software serial library to keep the hardware serial port free. More on that later.

The real thing.

The Arduino UNO worked very well. Well enough to convince me to use a small Arduino Pro Mini and make the thing real.

The Interak uses a 15 way D type on the front for the keyboard connector and so I soldered the Pro Mini as close as I could to the connector and the the three wires to the USB board.

161003-img_20161003_210244Next, get it into a small case… 161005-img_20161005_200524

Proof if proof were needed.

161005-img_20161005_200700So there you go. My beloved Interak has a new lease of life.

One more thing…

There is a nice little addition waiting in the wings here. The Arduino has another serial port, the hardware one and so It would be quite easy to add the standard USB to serial board and then the Interak’s keyboard port would appear to my PC as a serial port and I could squirt data into from a terminal emulator. There would be no handshaking and so I’d have to artificially drop the data rate with delays but it would work.

The code.

/*
* Interak-1 USB keyboard adapter
*
* By Andy Collins.
*
* This code is free to use.
*/
#include <SoftwareSerial.h>

#define CR 0x0d
#define LF 0x0a

SoftwareSerial mySerial(11, 12); // RX, TX

const int STROBE = 9;
const int D6 = 8;

int inByte = 0; // incoming serial byte
int lastInByte = 0;

void setup()
{
// Open the hardware serial port for debugging
Serial.begin(9600);

// Start the SoftwareSerial port
mySerial.begin(9600);
DDRD = DDRD | B11111100; // Using d2-d7 as output. Saving d0-1 just in case.

pinMode(STROBE, OUTPUT);
pinMode(D6, OUTPUT);

digitalWrite(STROBE, LOW);
}

void loop() // run over and over
{
inByte = -1; // Nothing yet

if (mySerial.available()) // USB Keyboard
{
inByte = mySerial.read();
}
else if (Serial.available()) // USB Serial port
{
inByte = Serial.read();
}

if(inByte != -1)
{
Serial.write(inByte);

if( (inByte == LF) && (lastInByte == CR) )
{
;
}
else
{
PORTD = inByte << 2; // Shift left to avoid TX, RX;

// Catch the overflow.
digitalWrite(D6, inByte & 0x40);

// Bits set up. Now Strobe;
digitalWrite(STROBE, HIGH);
delay(30);
digitalWrite(STROBE, LOW);
delay(100);
}

lastInByte = inByte;
}
}

 

 

Retrochallenge 2016/2 – Oh-oh we’re half way there

161003-img_20161003_210244In my last post I started setting up my stall and wrote a simply Arduino sketch to read a character from the Hobbytronics USB keyboard adapter and squirt it to my PC.

My Interak-1 has a 15 way D-type connector for the keyboard as I’ve decided that my keyboard solution will plug into that rather than be buried inside the machine itself.

I have  also decided that the final project will live on an Arduino Pro mini as they are tiny and so the photo above shows the Arduino soldered onto a 15 way D-type plug linked to the USB keyboard PCB.

Cut to the chase.

161003-img_20161003_210058This photo shows things are basically working! Happy Happy Joy Joy etc.

There is some boxing up to be done and some writing up to be do so that if there is another Interak-1 user out there who needs a keyboard, they can see what I’ve done.

It’s not so daft really as plenty of old machines used 7 bit parallel ASCII keyboards and plenty of those will have been lost.

More to follow.

 

Retrochallenge 2016/2 – Interak keyboard

So RC is upon us and I have decided to replace the failed keyboard on my newly acquired Interak-1 with a modern USB item.

The Interak keyboard uses a 7 bit parallel interface to present an ASCII character to machine itself with a strobe line to say that the data is ready. It’s a bit much to ask the Interak to cope with USB directly and it’s a bit much for me to learn enough about USB to be able to program a Z80 to cope in the time allowed and I don’t want to.

161001-img_20161001_181323Enter HobbyTronics who produce a small USB host board that just needs 5v and a USB keyboard and will produce a serial output.

The serial output can’t go straight in to the Interak either but serial to parallel isn’t too bad.

Enter Arduino.

161001-img_20161001_205049So, here we have an Arduino UNO with a prototype shield and a tiny USB keyboard. At the moment it’s just reading the serial input from the keyboard adapter and squirting it down the serial port to the PC but it’s a start.161001-img_20161001_205115 Next is to set up some pins for the parallel interface.

Keep watching (if you want).